Day 12: The War of Art

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Today felt good.

Product

I wrote about a book titled The War of Art.

If you haven’t heard of it, it’s by Steven Pressfield and it discusses how creatives battle Resistance with a capital R, and how you can win that battle.

It’s especially interesting, because Steven’s story is one of true perseverance, as you’ll see in the sales letter.

Who is the Customer?

The reader/customer is an artist or creative who recognizes that he/she isn’t living up to his/her full potential.

They don’t know what the solution to that problem is, but they’re looking for it — whether that search is conscious or unconscious.

They’re uninspired, unmotivated, unsure of themselves. They’re making excuses for why they’re not working harder or haven’t succeeded yet — and they know they’re making excuses. Maybe not consciously, but deep down they know that. That’s why the book resonates with them, because it hits this deep chord they know is true.

Customer Level of Awareness & Sophistication

This customer is problem-aware.

They know that they’re not achieving their full potential, whether consciously or unconsciously. For those who are at the unconscious level, the Pre-Headline of the sales letter calls out that struggle to get them at the level of awareness necessary for the letter to be effective.

Big Idea + Rationale

The big idea is that the reader is creatively blocked and facing an invisible foe that’s continuously sabotaging them.

Big Promise + Rationale

The promise is that, since Steven Pressfield has been fighting this battle for years, he knows how to win. The book is essentially a “battle plan” for conquering creative block and defeating the invisible foe (Resistance).

Lessons Learned

Headlines are ridiculously important throughout a letter.

I’ve always recognized the importance of the main headline, but in today’s letter, I used some templates from Copyhackers, as I’ve been doing for the past few days, to beef up the headlines throughout, and they made a huge difference.

I’ve read before that the main purpose of headlines is to break up copy, and I think that’s true. But headlines shouldn’t just do that. Each headline should instill a serious desire to continue reading.

If you’ve been studying copywriting for a while, you’re probably thinking: “Duh. Every sentence should instill a desire to read the next one.”

Yeah, I know. But for whatever reason, I didn’t apply that to headlines until today. So, this might be something you’ve been aware of for a long time, but PSA:

All your headlines are important AF, not just the one that starts your letter.

Robert Lucas