Day 14: Leadpages

DISCLAIMER (READ THIS FIRST):

THIS IS NOT A LEGITIMATE ADVERTISEMENT, NOR SHOULD IT BE TAKEN AS SUCH. I AM NOT AFFILIATED WITH THE COMPANY IN ANY WAY. DO NOT MAKE A PURCHASE DECISION BASED ON THE INFORMATION YOU SEE ON THIS PAGE.


Have you ever watched a horse race?

You can almost always bet that the horse who comes out of the gate first will finish somewhere near the end. It gasses out too quickly.

That’s how I felt about this sales letter.

Product

Today, I wrote about Leadpages, a popular landing page builder.

Who is the Customer?

The customer is a busy entrepreneur. Anywhere between 30 and 60.

He/she understands marketing funnels at a high level and knows that the company needs to build an email list, but the knowledge stops somewhere around there.

Customer Level of Awareness & Sophistication

This customer is Solution Aware, maybe even Product Aware.

Regardless, they’ve seen other landing page builders before. So you’ll notice that the letter doesn’t hardly sell the concept of an email list or WHY landing pages are important, because it’s assumed the reader knows that already.

Instead, it works to position Leadpages as the best builder for their particular situation.

Big Idea + Rationale

The big idea is that a busy entrepreneur has limited time. They don’t need “perfection,” they just need “done.”

Big Promise + Rationale

The big promise is this:

Because Leadpages comes with a substantial amount of templates and the builder is so simple to use, it’s got an incredibly quick learning curve and requires little effort to get up-and-running (i.e. generating leads).

Lessons Learned

One of the difficulties of doing a sales letter per day is that I can’t get incredibly deep into a product, which means that writing to a Product Aware or Solution Aware market is challenging.

You’ve got to develop an intimate knowledge of a product in order to describe it in a way that’s both simple and enticing.

Oddly enough, I have little interest in writing for SaaS products at this point. Maybe it’s because it was so hard to put words on the page, but I think I enjoy writing for products where I can use a bit more of a narrative structure, instead of hyping of features and benefits.

That said, I realize that I need to get a lot better at writing features and benefits regardless, because I often find myself reverting to the same bullet structure or using the same phrases repeatedly — not cool.

Robert Lucas