Day 15: The Power Potato by Meditater

DISCLAIMER (READ THIS FIRST):

THIS IS NOT A LEGITIMATE ADVERTISEMENT, NOR SHOULD IT BE TAKEN AS SUCH.

IT’S A JOKE.

DO NOT MAKE A PURCHASE DECISION BASED ON THE INFORMATION YOU SEE ON THIS PAGE.


I feel like I start a lot of these with “it was fun,” or some variation of that.

But my hope is that today wasn’t just fun for me to write, but will be fun for you to read as well.

Today was my 15th day writing these, and I figured I’d give myself a little break by writing something that would require very little research and that would let me be as ridiculous as possible.

Product

I wrote about a product called Power Potato by Meditater.

This is an idea my friends and I came up with and shot a (yet to be released) Kickstarter video for.

We’re planning to eventually launch that Kickstarter, but probably won’t use this whole sales letter — it’s a little too ridiculous. I’d imagine parts of it make the cut, though.

Who is the Customer?

The customer is a millennial with disposable income.

Interested in health, self-actualization, and memes.

Likely suffers from anxiety, but isn’t crippled by it and doesn’t take himself/herself too seriously.

Customer Level of Awareness

This one would work best for a problem-aware customer, but preferably not one desperate for a solution, as they would just get pissed off when I say “oh yeah, it’s a potato, btw.”

Big Idea + Rationale

The big idea is that there is a “miracle plant” that the reader is familiar with, but hasn’t been able to “harness its power” yet.

Big Promise + Rationale

The Power Potato allows them to “harness the power of the potato” and send one to their friends to help them through tough times.

Lessons Learned

Now that I’m writing this, I think the biggest issue is that the big idea and the big promise aren’t tied together well enough.

The big idea is engaging and inspires a lot of curiosity, but I didn’t do a great job of tying the product to that idea — or at least describing why someone would send a Power Potato to a friend instead of just writing on a potato and keeping it for his/herself.

Beyond that, I loved using an opener that teases the product and hints at a lot of details, but doesn’t figuratively spill the beans until pretty far down the page.

If you’re wanting to write an opener like that, I think the key is to be intimately familiar with the product. Know its story and know its features and benefits, so you can sprinkle them throughout a narrative without saying exactly what you’re talking about until it’s absolutely necessary.

Robert Lucas