Day 18: Therapy

DISCLAIMER (READ THIS FIRST):

THIS IS NOT A LEGITIMATE ADVERTISEMENT, NOR SHOULD IT BE TAKEN AS SUCH. I AM NOT AFFILIATED WITH THE COMPANY IN ANY WAY. DO NOT MAKE A PURCHASE DECISION BASED ON THE INFORMATION YOU SEE ON THIS PAGE.


So — uhhhh, yeah. I wrote a sales letter about therapy.

Product

Not like a cool new app called Thera.py or anything like that. Nope — just actual talk therapy.

Why?

Well, to be honest, I procrastinated pretty hard today. So I knew that, unless I wanted to be up late, I’d have to write about something that I’m familiar with and that I understand the demographic of.

And that’s how you end up with a sales letter about talk therapy for millennials.

Who is the Customer?

The customer/reader is a career-focused millennial who’s affected by anxiety or depression or who just genuinely feels like he/she is running from problems as opposed to actually facing them.

Customer Level of Awareness

I’d say this customer is Solution-Aware. But I don’t think the reader would immediately resonate with a message of “therapy is important, you should do it.” So, the letter drills down into the pain points of being a millennial who experiences anxiety, depression, and a racing mind before presenting the solution.

The idea is that, by presenting the pain in a tangible way that the reader can resonate with, when the solution is presented, he/she will be more receptive to it instead of discounting it immediately.

Big Idea + Rationale

The big idea is that, while millennials often consciously or unconsciously adopt the philosophy of “I’m not going to think about it right now” to solve problems — that doesn’t always work.

Big Promise + Rationale

The promise is that, in therapy, you’ll get a safe space and an experienced professional, to help you deal with the problems you’re facing, so that you can stop running from them and start fixing them.

Lessons Learned

Time, time, time.

I might have mentioned this before, but up until the last few months, it’s been my belief that, if someone is paying me to write, I should be writing.

At face value, that makes sense. But here’s the deal:

The writing is infinitely better when I’ve had more time to do research and immerse myself in the idea.

Since today’s letter was thrown together, it’s half-decent, at best.

Aside from The Power Potato (Day 15), the best letters I’ve written have been the ones I’ve spent the most time on.

I’d be willing to bet there’s a direct correlation between the quality of a letter and the amount of time I spent on it.

That said, when doing client work, I no longer feel that my #1 priority should be writing. Research comes first.

After that, the writing will handle itself.

Robert Lucas