Day 2: Calm Thoughts

DISCLAIMER (READ THIS FIRST):

THIS IS NOT A LEGITIMATE ADVERTISEMENT, NOR SHOULD IT BE TAKEN AS SUCH. I AM NOT AFFILIATED WITH THE COMPANY IN ANY WAY. DO NOT MAKE A PURCHASE DECISION BASED ON THE INFORMATION YOU SEE ON THIS PAGE.

Beyond that, ingredients in this supplement are known to interact with common medications. So, talk to your doctor before taking this or any other supplement.


Today’s sales letter was interesting.

I did the bulk of the research last night, which will be my plan going forward. (About 2 hours or research in the PM and 1-2 hours of writing the next AM — ideally.)

But this was (as far as I can remember) the first sales letter I’ve written for a supplement. There were a few things I really enjoyed, and a few things (dealing with ethics) that I really did not.

Product

Source Naturals Calm Thoughts

I chose this product because it’s something I’ve used before and really enjoyed. I haven’t taken it in awhile, but I remember it being extremely effective in maintaining some level of mental clarity/performance after a night of little sleep (which, after doing some research, I think is probably due to the Tyrosine in it — isn’t learning fun!?).

Who is the Customer?

I determined the target customer by perusing Amazon reviews. It seemed that most reviewers were female, and somewhere along the line, I developed the belief that most were middle-aged.

There was no real science that went into that determination — honestly just an educated guess on my part.

Customer Level of Awareness & Sophistication

I’d say the target customer is solution-aware in that, they understand taking a pill (or having a drink) can reduce anxiety and stress in the short-term.

However, I’d also say, for the purposes of this sales letter, they were aware of the wrong solution.

Big Idea + Rationale

There are a couple things at play with this big idea.

The first being that GABA, a neurotransmitter, is responsible to the relaxed, laid-back feeling associated with Benzos or alcohol.

The second being that it’s possible to attain a similar feeling without prescription drugs or alcohol.

The target customer either uses or has used prescription drugs or alcohol to “take the edge off” (that phrase pulled from at least one, probably 2 or more Amazon reviews).

But — the customer also knows (somewhere deep down) that constantly using prescription drugs or alcohol to numb feelings is not healthy.

So, the goal of the sales letter was not to change the solution (take a pill — which, in my personal opinion is probably NOT the actual best solution — more on that in the Lessons Learned section), but to change the type of solution from prescription drugs or alcohol to a seemingly more (not actually or entirely) natural solution.

Big Promise + Rationale

The big promise is that, by taking Calm Thoughts, you could achieve the same or similar effects as taking Benzodiazepines like Xanax or Valium or drinking alcohol — in a more seemingly natural manner.

Lessons Learned

I really liked doing the research for this letter. I’m realizing lately how important research is to the writing process.

In the past, I would sit down and start putting words on the page as quickly as possible. But I now realize that doing the research makes the writing part much easier.

The opener of this letter pretty much wrote itself after doing the research last night.

Being a consumer of supplements myself, I would assume that I’d like writing about them.

Surprisingly, I was wrong.

In doing the research I found that certain ingredients in the supplement might react adversely with other medications or not even provide the effect promised by the supplement.

Beyond that, I realized that I have a problem with encouraging someone I do not personally know to take a supplement. I don’t know their health history, I don’t know how they’ll react. And it’s my actual nightmare to recommend a supplement to a stranger, they take it, and have an adverse reaction.

I don’t want that on my conscience.

Aaaand, I’m not comfortable recommending a pill to fix anxiety or stress.

While some people certainly could benefit from that, my own experience has shown that things like meditation, exercise, time with friends, and working with a therapist are much more effective and beneficial than taking a pill and moving on.

So, the main lesson learned today (and yesterday) is that copywriting is very powerful. With the right amount of research, logic, and copywriting skills, you can make a convincing argument for nearly anything.

Make sure you’re making the argument for something you believe in, something that will actually help people. Don’t leave your ethics at the altar in favor of making more cash.

After yesterday and today, I have much more respect for the power that copywriting holds, and want to make sure the work I do promotes products that actually help people and make their lives better.

Robert Lucas