Day 22: Hinge

DISCLAIMER (READ THIS FIRST):

THIS IS NOT A LEGITIMATE ADVERTISEMENT, NOR SHOULD IT BE TAKEN AS SUCH. I AM NOT AFFILIATED WITH THE COMPANY IN ANY WAY. DO NOT MAKE A PURCHASE DECISION BASED ON THE INFORMATION YOU SEE ON THIS PAGE.


The actual writing today wasn’t too challenging, but it has been rough making the time to be at my computer while I’m at my family’s house for Thanksgiving.

Product

I wrote about Hinge — a dating app that’s made a point of being vastly different from both Tinder and Bumble.

Who is the Customer?

The customer is a millennial who likely lives in an urban area. While I have no data to back this up, I’d guess there’s a 50/50 split between male and female users. If this were a project I was being paid for, I’d do more research on that front.

Customer Level of Awareness

This customer is solution-aware.

They may be product-aware, but even in that case, I think the letter does a good job of explaining why Hinge works the way it does. Even if they’ve used the app, they may be unfamiliar with the logic behind its UX.

Big Idea + Rationale

Other popular dating apps in the market aren’t geared to get you dates — they’re geared to keep you using the apps.

Hinge, on the other hand, has been created to match you with someone you’d like so that you can stop using the app and get out in the real world.

Big Promise + Rationale

The promise is that, by using Hinge, you’re taking advantage of a more authentic and genuine dating experience

Lessons Learned

Writing for a product you genuinely believe in and have researched is nearly effortless.

If you’re convicted about what you’re writing, the words flow from your brain to the page seamlessly.

I think there’s something to learn in there about the projects we choose to work on.

Not only does writing for products we believe in feel better mentally and emotionally, it actually makes the work itself easier too.

Robert Lucas