Day 27: Treks Titanium Headphones

DISCLAIMER (READ THIS FIRST):

THIS IS NOT A LEGITIMATE ADVERTISEMENT, NOR SHOULD IT BE TAKEN AS SUCH. I AM NOT AFFILIATED WITH THE COMPANY IN ANY WAY. DO NOT MAKE A PURCHASE DECISION BASED ON THE INFORMATION YOU SEE ON THIS PAGE.


These past few days have been a grind. I feel like I’m crawling my way to the finish line.

Product

I wrote about Treks Titanium — a pair of bone conduction headphones especially useful for those who run, hike, or cycle.

Who is the Customer?

Since I’m using Bob Serling’s Power Copywriting Formula (as much as I can for a sales letter written in a day), I’m developing a customer profile here. Based on some research (and guesses), here’s what I’ve got:

Anthony

42

Lives in Portland, Oregon

Cycles to work most days (weather permitting)

Has two children. Son, Age 9: James. Daughter, Age 7: Anna.

Software Developer at a …

Went to college at University of Oregon

In addition to cycling for transportation, he likes to hike, run occasionally, and try out new recipes with his wife, Jen.

Customer Level of Awareness & Sophistication

This customer is problem-aware. But it’s not a problem they like to admit: they’re putting themselves in danger.

One challenge with this letter was highlighting the pain (cyclists unnecessarily putting themselves in danger) without coming off as preachy. Honestly, I don’t think I did a great job at this, and it’s something I would improve if I had more time on this one.

Big Idea + Rationale

The big idea is that cyclists who want to listen to something (music, audiobooks, podcasts) while riding have had to either choose between their safety or their enjoyment. It’s an unfair decision.

They already place a lot of trust in drivers, so it doesn’t make sense to give up something (their hearing) that could keep them safer...but sometimes you want to listen to something while you ride. That’s where Treks Titanium comes in.

Big Promise + Rationale

The big promise is that, with Treks Titanium, cyclists no longer have to choose between safety or enjoyment.

They can have both.

Lessons Learned

I’m a big fan of Bob Serling’s Power Copywriting Formula. It’s 36 steps and its intensive.

I didn’t follow all the steps in this letter, but followed the ones that were reasonable/made sense for this letter.

One thing I really enjoyed was that it’s not just a process for writing the letter, it addresses the offer and the research as well, which I really like. It’s one of the most comprehensive formulas I’ve come across.

Beyond that, it has you write the features and benefits before writing the headline. I wasn’t crazy about that initially, but once I started, I really liked it, because it forces you to go beyond “how am I going to start this letter?” and starts with “what’s most important about this product?”

And I think that’s a great place to start.

Robert Lucas