Day 4: CRAVE Dog Food

DISCLAIMER (READ THIS FIRST):

THIS IS NOT A LEGITIMATE ADVERTISEMENT, NOR SHOULD IT BE TAKEN AS SUCH. I AM NOT AFFILIATED WITH THE COMPANY IN ANY WAY. DO NOT MAKE A PURCHASE DECISION BASED ON THE INFORMATION YOU SEE ON THIS PAGE.

While CRAVE isn’t the worst food for your dog by any means, I don’t think it’s the best food for your dog, either.

So, again, do not make a purchase decision based on the information on this page.


This is the perfect example of an ad that needed more time. There are a few bits that show some promise, but overall, I don’t think my Big Idea or Big Promise had enough time to develop.

More on that in the Lessons Learned section.

Product

Today, I wrote about CRAVE Dog Food — which is the food I feed to my dog, Wallace. (pic included)

Who is the Customer?

As far as I can tell, dog owners are spread pretty evenly across male/female and age demographics.

The one important thing I noted was that the customer needs to have disposable income. If you don’t know where your own next meal is coming from, you probably aren’t too worried about what your dog is eating.

Customer Level of Awareness

The customer in this scenario is unaware. The letter educates them about the problem (their dog’s diet should mimic a wolf’s diet).

However, if I could re-do it, “solution-aware” might be more appropriate, because I think a lot of people recognize the importance of grain-free diets for both humans and dogs.

Big Idea + Rationale

The big idea is that, since dogs are descendants of wolves, their diet should closely match that of wolves (i.e. mostly meat).

Big Promise + Rationale

The big promise is that CRAVE gives dogs a diet similar to their wolf ancestors in an affordable package.

Lessons Learned

I think there’s a tendency among new or new-ish copywriters to believe that clients pay for words or time.

i.e.

“If you hire me to write a sales page, you’re paying me for the amount of words I write or the amount of time it takes to complete the project.”

And, indeed, some clients to prefer to pay by-the-hour, or by-the-word.

But ultimately, in those pricing models, the idea is to get the work done as quickly as possible. Clients might get the words, but they don’t get the expertise.

See, I don’t think the real value of copywriting lies in a copywriter simply being able to provide copy.

If the M.O. is “Hey, can you write this? I need it ASAP.,” then you’re not going to get anything good.

The magic happens after the writer has had time to immerse himself (or herself) in the idea for long enough to let it percolate and fully develop.

Today’s sales letter was not great, because, while I think some of the ideas expressed in it were sound, I needed more time to fully develop them in order to make a strong argument.

So — if you’re a copywriter working with a client who doesn’t understand why copywriting takes so long, remind them of this.

They are not paying you just for words. If they were, you could charge them $100, throw some garbage onto a page, and deliver it before the day was over.

Instead, they are paying you for the right words, which only come after hours of research, thinking, writing, editing, researching more, thinking more, writing more, and editing more.

Putting words on a page is quick. Putting the right words on a page takes a long time.

Robert Lucas